Mystical Dangers

(djinn are essentially vapor.)
“I blew him away.”

Rachel Caine

Djinn

treasures are granted
from power older than time
magic must balance
supernatural order
think again before you wish


Inked honour

a true right to write
is born deep within the blood
without pure belief
one can’t have a moral soul
when another pays for the ink


The waka is a Japanese 5-line poem (or stanza) with the same 5-7-5-7-7 syllable structure as a tanka.
However, the first 2 lines should make up one piece, the next 2 lines should make the next, and then, the final line can stand on its own, or as part of the second group.


Read with Care

long abandoned by patrons, in a library
hidden on a dusty shelf, I found a bible,
and I was surprised to see, a warning label
bright red text which read beware, religious faith kills


The imayo is a 4-line Japanese poem that has 12 syllables in each line, with a caesura (or pause) between the first 7 syllables and the final 5.
The image was originally written to be sung but is not a requirement.
There are no restrictions on the subject matter.


Weekly Theme:

Random Poetry Forms


13 thoughts on “Mystical Dangers

  1. Very compelling poetry forms, intricate and simple. The “Inked honour” waka has some fun word play and raises a much needed question, “How willing are writers to whore themselves out?”

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I was under the impression that the waka and the tanka were the same – waka being the older name for the same form… Loved the first one made me think of the rule of physics – for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction!! I guess magic has to play by the same rules of the universe as everything else…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I think they are of the same family. You know the Japanese, a slight variation and you have a whole new form.
      The idea came to me quickly.
      I recently read a master of djinn. It discusses the repercussions of magic use. Your thought sums it up nicely.

      Like

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