Children’s Story: The Lonely Apple



The apple fell
Not far from the tree
But rolled and rolled
and was lost to the wild
The farmer won’t find me, and the neighbourhood children won’t either,
thought the poor little apple.
The apple sat and withered
Hidden under a dense bush
Sad and alone
Slowly he shrank in the cold
Buried by the winter snow
Until he finally disappears

As the spring sun shines
And the snow melts away
A seed at the heart of the apple sprouts
Over years the apple
Becomes a tree
but still he finds himself lonely
As the apple tree continues to grow
He notices apples forming on his branches
His own apples
And finally
He is no longer alone
He is happy


I spoke with a fellow blogger recently about editing. I myself, edit like crazy.
He said he occasional writes directly to his blog with little to no editing and suggested I try the same.
So, this week I’ll be posting material that I’ve given myself about 15 minutes to write and haven’t edited other than glaring spelling and grammatical mistakes.


94 thoughts on “Children’s Story: The Lonely Apple

  1. In a separate vein. To not edit violates the craft. You write for an audience, how much a disservice you do them if you make them stumble the slightest bit to complete assimilation of your tale, large or small, serious or humorous. Editing is painful, and, it seems, at least for the unbright like me, never complete. But it is part of the artistry. I snicker, above, see “chi9ldren.” Less art, most would agree, comments, purely blogworks, and casual conversation accommodate imperfection. A story, a morality, a fable, an aside, or a diversion for an unknown but targeted audience, especially something of permanance, I think not. Press on, craft the tale in the magic fabric of words, but allow perfection as near was we can manage it, its place. Respectfully and purely opinion – SPW

    Liked by 2 people

    1. For the most part I over edit everything I post. The idea for this whole week was November’s novel writing challenge.
      Writing what I could in a specific time without thought of a final result, just words in paper. I gave myself 15 minutes.
      I noted at the end of each post that I had made grammatical and spelling corrections where necessary to aid in comprehension. Attempts that weren’t of an intelligible standard weren’t posted. I wouldn’t knowingly publish anything I didn’t feel could be understood. But I also didn’t want to post peices that had been polished to the best of my ability. That is not what the challenge is about.
      Thank you for your thought provoking comment and opinion – Mouse.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I barely edit at all (apart from typos) and so I heartily approve of what you’ve done here. Are you happy with the result? How would you change it if you were allowed more time? I’ll stop now because I’m starting to sound like a teacher (or a therapist (neither of which I am)). πŸ˜€
    Have a lovely day.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I wrote one for each day if the week. Looking back I can see changes I’d like to make to all of them.
      For this particular post, there was some subtle rewording, I wanted to change the tense in the second half. Maybe add a line or two to make it smoother. The ending definately needs to be softened, it crashes to a halt.
      I could do all that, look at it in a week and change it again πŸ˜‚
      I enjoyed the freedom of this week. And the results were great. I didn’t crash and burn as much as I expected. More successes than flops πŸ‘
      Have a great Robert C Day!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thanks for the explanation. It makes reading blog posts a lot more interesting when you get the option to ask questions and get such exquisitely nuanced replies. Often, when I read a book I’d like to ask the author a question or two about where the ideas come from or how much a character is based on someone real. It’d make books so much more interesting if we could, don’t you think? πŸ™‚
        Have a lovely day … erm, sorry … what should I call you?

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      2. No worries. I normally don’t explain poetry, at least cryptic/abstract poetry. I prefer the reader to make what they want from the reading. I’ve had a few in the past where I’ve written a scathing, brutal poem and had responses telling me they felt the love in the lines. Personal perception is everything.
        There are a few books that have just that. I think all of Neil Gaimans short story collections have an introduction and background for each story.
        But you are right. The WordPress community allows you to message directly with the author which is a wonderful opportunity for teaching, learning and understanding.
        Most around these parts call me mouse πŸ˜‰

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      3. Mouse. What an interesting name! My middle name is Cat and so we’d best not meet otherwise there’d be trouble! πŸ˜€
        And I love Neil Gaiman’s work. He’s almost as entertaining as me when he writes stories. πŸ˜‰
        So, yeah – have a great whatever you’re having right now and we’ll no doubt speak later.
        Robert C Day.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. I was going to ask about that mysterious C.
        He has his moments. I listened to a short story set in the Neverwhere universe last week which was surprisingly good. I’m half way through trigger warnings. Click clack sack is a stand out.
        Currently answering messages, drinking tea, watching the rain.
        Have a good one. Until we speak again.
        Mouse

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      5. Meow-wah-me-uh-ow-meep-meow.
        Charly says that you should never talk to strangers crossing the road when the red mani is flashing. πŸ˜‰
        Yeah, it actually stands for Colin, but how boring is that! Last one I read of his was the one he wrote with Terry Pratchett and was recently made into a series on Amazon Prime. I found it to be a bit silly, but I guess that might have been Terry’s doing. American Gods in my fave. Where was it raining?

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      6. Wise. Beware the red man. But moreso beware the orange man πŸ˜‰
        I can think of a lot worse words starting with C πŸ˜‚
        That’s the one, about a missing coat. It was okay. I’m rather silly, so the perfect audience.
        God’s was okay. I like neverwhere, anansi boys. Some of the shorts.
        It was raining in Helsinki. Snowing today. First snow of the season.

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      7. Helsinki. That’s somewhere near Finland, right? I hear the people there are (sorry, I have no words, only images that defy explanation when it’s late and I’m tired). Anyway, I have favourable impressions. No snow yet in England. πŸ™‚

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      8. Somewhere near πŸ˜‰
        You are right. People here are. There are no words to describe them (that I don’t get in trouble for using)
        Snows gone, but they are expecting more next week. There is a drastic change year to year, we should be ankle deep by now.
        Where in England?

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      9. I’m in York, which is the north of England. I can’t really describe the people here because I’m too close to them to be able to tell the difference between them and me. You would be able to note our characteristics instantly because you’re not from around here and so the differences would leap out at you. Similarly, if I were there then I would be able to tell you things about you that you perhaps never realise. Interesting, yes? πŸ™‚

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      10. Closest I’ve been to York is Manchester and Newcastle. I somehow managed to curve around York.
        I suppose its hard to see the forest from the trees.
        I’ve been to 40 or 50 countries now. After a while you just realise, people are people no matter where you go.
        I live in Finland but I’m not Finnish πŸ˜‰ the differences stare me in the face everyday, and somehow, if I do manage to forget how far from home I am, and try to fit in, I’m reminded on a daily basis that I don’t belong here.

        Liked by 2 people

      11. Wait – let me have a couple of guesses – you’re either Canadian or Russian, right? πŸ™‚
        But aw, c’mon – one world, surely! We all belong everywhere (except perhaps on Mars). πŸ˜€

        Liked by 1 person

      12. Neither 🀣
        I’m Australian πŸ˜‰
        Unfortunately, racism is everywhere too.
        I have a few people in mind who would be perfect for mars.
        I personally would love to live long enough to see the red planet.
        I’m guessing you didn’t put your name down fir the expedition?

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      13. Yeah, I can see how you would be able to spot the differences between the Australians and the Finns. πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‡
        Funnily enough I just wrote a sci-fi novel about the first flight to Mars (not published (yet)) and so you could say I have an interest. πŸ™‚
        Kylie Minogue for Mars? 😎

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      14. The moment I open my mouth. Which is often πŸ˜‚
        Not sending Kylie to Mars!!! She is a shinning opal of the world.
        I read that the first people to Mars would die horrible, excruciating deaths at that hands of unforgiving cancer withing 20 years.
        When is the book published?

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      15. Haha – just keep opening your mouth – you’re fine. How’s your Finnish coming on? πŸ™‚
        I was reminded of Kylie because she just scored another number one album here in the UK – a record in so many ways – I’ll let you look it up. πŸ™‚ So, yeah – an opal in truth. Actually, I remember watching her in Neighbours when it was first broadcast. A bonny lass, yes?
        And yeah, there’s going to be a bit of radiation problem on Mars (and the trip there) so let’s hope they’ve got something to shield them with.
        The book? Ah, I don’t know. It’s just about getting around to stuff really. I’m a bit of a procrastinator. 😦 But sometime. Definitely sometime. πŸ™‚

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      16. My Finnish is awful. I rarely use it. People just want to speak English with meband I’m happy/ lazy enough to let them.
        I heard her most recent single, didn’t think much of it.
        Big frizzy hair on neighbours, locomotion days πŸ˜‚ that was a long, long time ago.
        Let’s hope they fidute it out in our life time. I don’t want to die before I get the chance to leave this rock.
        Keep us posted on the book πŸ‘

        Liked by 1 person

      17. Odd are that when you die you’re going to be leaving this rock anyway. πŸ™‚ Unless you’re a big believer in reincarnation I suppose. πŸ˜‰
        The book. Yeah, I’ll have a big launch party here on WordPress when I manage to squeeze it out.

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      18. I guess there is a chance some of me might leave this rock, but the rest is getting driven deeper into it πŸ˜‚
        Sounds great, a perfectly acceptable corona party!

        Liked by 1 person

      19. Hmm. Maybe I should wait for a lull between pandemics. 🀠
        I guess you’re not going to publish novels. It might blow your cover. At the moment I don’t even know which gender you’re aligning yourself to. πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      20. People are at home with nothing but time. If you’re not reading books, youre writing them. Sales must be huge on ebooks at the moment.
        I’ll be self publishing next year. Still undecided about real or pen name. A few sites on WordPress where I have guest posted let my name slip.
        As for gender that is common knowledge these days, I’m male, born and raised. Most likely die that way too πŸ˜‰

        Liked by 1 person

      21. Haha – death go claim your body but you go go on going. πŸ˜‚
        But why the secrecy anyway? Don’t tell me if I’m being too nosy.
        Tell you what, I’ll race you. First to publish something substantial gets a prize. 🀠

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      22. I’ll leave a sign on my face that reads ‘gone fishing.’
        No one knows I write but my wife. I think the day my family and friends find out is the day I start censoring myself. I don’t want that. I just want to write whatever nonsense pours out.
        I can self publish 4 books tomorrow πŸ˜‰
        My poetry book
        Children’s rhyme book
        Limerick book
        Flash fiction book
        First novel I can probably get done next year some time.
        Or are you talking having something published through an actual publisher?

        Liked by 1 person

      23. If you wish. We can set the rules at either Amazon (of Lulu or whatever) or through a proper publisher.
        I can have a flash fiction compendium (posh word, right), a poetry book (or two), a book on how to write, a couple of novels (would need to work at it, but the third is not far off) and a book of my drawings good to go by … (depends how much I rush) … a month from now. I put a children’s book out on Amazon a bit back just to see how easy the process is (very easy) so that’s done. All the rest is down to whether I have the balls (‘scuse my French) to out myself as a writer. I mean, people know I write, but this would be showing them what I’ve been writing, if you know what I mean. It’s the fear of … not quite being up to scratch that holds me back I think.
        ‘Gone Fishing.’ I like that. πŸ™‚ Everyone should have a death-sign in their pocket – just in case. πŸ˜€

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      24. I have no intention of rushing to publish so I’m guessing youll take the win.
        What did you use to publish on amazon?
        You just said exactly what I’ve been saying, right down to the balls line.
        That being said, I’ve seen/read some awful stuff people have self published. It gives me hope that I won’t be the bottom of the barrel 🀣 death signs = billion dollar idea πŸ€”

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      25. It’s by no means a done deal that’ll I’ll get these things out before you. 😦 I’m a born procrastinator. So much so that I’m putting off my death until I’m 120 (at least). πŸ™‚
        What do you mean by ‘what did you use’? I just used Amazon’s instructions?
        Here’s the thing – you and me can write proper. And we know we can write proper. So no worries on the proficiency scale. We both just need to grow a pair (two pairs – one each). πŸ˜€

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      26. But you’ve already released something πŸ˜‰
        120 sounds awful πŸ˜‚ unless modern medicine has become alien medicine, I will fallen apart by then.
        Oh, I thought you may have used a 3rd party program and uploaded.
        Thank you for the compliment.
        I don’t know if growing a pair is integral to success, I read that Hitler only had one testicle and look what that failing artist accomplished πŸ˜‚ (not sure if I should be using that emoji but who’s gonna stop me)

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      27. Type Amazon and then my name with quotes and it’s the top result in Google. You know any good eight year old illustrators that can draw peacocks? πŸ™‚

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      28. The hungry caterpillar? Eric carle has a unique style.
        Good idea. I’d offer my children but they are too young, and to be honest, not up to standard.

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      29. Haha – thanks for the thought. πŸ™‚ I actually don’t know if Eric Carle did his own illustrations or if he ’employed” a child. Either way, the illustrations are extraordinarily effective and add an extra dimension to the story. It’s that effect I would like to achieve.

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      30. I always thought he did them himself for some reason, even though they could easily have been made by a child.
        True, I catching, bold shapes and colours, they explained this to us when we were teaching our children.
        You could get stumbling drunk and attempt it πŸ€”

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      31. Just Jackson Pollock and cut out shapes.
        I’ve made a few covers. Trial and error stuff. I was going to upload the same way you didn’t but it was asking for a different format image than I had so I switched off the laptop πŸ˜‚

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      32. Haha – yeah, I should probably raise my own expectations when I think about it.
        Here’s the thing about publishing on Amazon – I think that much of what I wrote is not up to standard and some can go on Amazon, but that the last novel I wrote is pretty good and deserves to be published properly. It’s just getting around to it.

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      33. Well do the work proud. No sense in rushing it. I have no intention of doing so.
        I’ve read a few books from other WordPress bloggers and Instagramers recently and the quality of writing and publishing has been so poor it has turned me off them.

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      34. Damn good point. Of course, I’m an amazing writer and so no-one could ever get ‘turned off’ me, but you do make a very good case for good editing and careful, deliberate, slow, precision book releasing. πŸ™‚
        Have you read the book by Damyanti Biswas (You Beneath Your Skin) – I’m reading it now on Kindle and it’s quite good. Just been picked up to make into a TV series too. And yeah, I’m going green just thinking about it. πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      35. I’ve been known to make a good point here and there.
        I’m nothing if not slow πŸ˜‚
        Haven’t heard of the book or author. I have a stack of books so long. I’m reading 3 and an audio book currently, and I still can’t catch up.
        I’ll look into it, maybe put it in the list πŸ‘

        Liked by 1 person

      36. The only reason I mentioned Damyanti is that she’s a blogger here on WordPress. I knew her before she was famous, just as I know you before your fame and fortune. πŸ˜‰
        I’m thinking of joining an online writing group where people read out their stuff on Zoom (or something) – you know of any?

        Liked by 1 person

      37. Ah, a success story!
        I appreciate your vote of confidence and your candor, but I don’t spend enough time writing to excel.
        My money is on you. You seem to have a passion and belief I can’t afford.
        People have told me about these groups in the past. I’ve never taken much notice, given my schedule and time zone it would be unlikely I could participate.

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      38. I’m a software developer for my day job (and don’t worry, I’m not going to give it up any time soon) and so I really only have a little time to write. It’s just that I enjoy doing it. I like the way that words flow and the effect they have on people. When I put effort into a post then I can really tell the difference in the quality and quantity of feedback I get. I suppose it’s that kind of thing that makes me want to get better. What takes up all of your time?

        Liked by 1 person

      39. Development, that must help with ebooks in some way?
        I’ve found when your enjoying it, it flows better. Also when you have slabs of time to write.
        Very true. Most times you can feel the passion in the writing, and the purpose should always be to improve.
        Full time job and three children under the age of five. I steal moments here and there to write.

        Liked by 1 person

      40. Three children under 5 – wow – that must be a real time-suck.. ahem.. I mean – that must be a real joy when you want to write because they give you so much inspiration with theit constant questions and stuff. Maaan, I’m not sure I could cope. So yeah, I feel you when you say you snatch minutes here and there.
        I’ve always been into computers and the things they can do and so, yeah – it helps with the technical stuff. Where you were doing travelling I was doing learning – that’s my passion really. I write novels because the idea of doing that scared me and I don’t want anything to scare me and so I.. well, I just do it. Enjoying it is a real bonus, though. πŸ™‚
        I have an app on my phone that I should use more called Speechnotes. This is what I just said to it “This is something called speechnotes that transcribes everything I say” and it did a beautiful job. I can’t write stories with it though… Hey, now that’s a realisation: speaking interferes with my thinking! Ha, that explains a lot!! πŸ˜€

        Liked by 1 person

      41. Oh it sucks. I’m usually too exhausted by the end of the day to get much done.
        But, they are the inspiration that started me writing again. I hadn’t written in about fifteen years. When they twins were born I had the idea that I would write a rhyme book for them. Most of what I came up with wasn’t child friendly and it became this blog.
        Always good to be tech savvy. More so these days.
        I know speechnotes, didn’t work so well with my accent πŸ˜‚
        So don’t expect you to be doing any spoken word folk tales any time soon 😏

        Liked by 1 person

      42. I’m going to guess that the indigenous Australian peoples have some folk tales going on. It’s be great to hear them translated to different settings or even to know how they compare with Finnish folk tales. How are you raising your kids, if you don’t mind me asking? But there’s a lot of potential to get confused. Writing your stuff down could really help them I guess.
        And yeah, it took me years to mellow out my Yorkshire (Sheffield) accent enough for machines to understand me. Try listening to Four Yorkshiremen by Monty Python to get some idea of what I mean. I’m going to see if I can get Speechnotes to transcribe that now – just for fun. πŸ˜‚

        Liked by 1 person

      43. There is a rich culture in the aboriginal community. Many fascinating stories involving dreamtime and Australia’s native animals.
        Finns have similar stories, saying etc revolving around animals. The big folk story is the Kalevala. Not really for kids.
        I only speak English with the kids, wife speaks Finnish. They say it’s the best way for dual language households.
        School and health care systems are some of the best in the world, much better than oz. Raising them here.
        That’s a good sketch. But you try to tell the young people that and they wouldn’t understand.
        Did it work?

        Liked by 1 person

      44. Of course it didn’t work! It didn’t even recognise it as human speech! πŸ˜€
        We didn’t have local legends and folk stories in Yorkshire when we were growing up. We just had books like Brer Rabbit and fairy stories and stuff like that. Makes me wonder if I wasn’t missing something. It’d be interesting to hear your kids in 40 years time talking about what they remember. I wonder if it’ll be all about Dora the Explorer and… Spongebob Squarepants and stuff like that. I think that’s what we have to write for – so that they can remember stuff.
        Ha, so you travelled the world and got snagged by a Finnish woman then. Nice. πŸ˜†

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      45. Funny, I didn’t think their accents were that thick.
        I guess there are legends and stories of local colour wherever you come from.
        My kids are big on paw patrol, booba, muumin, and I can’t stand any of them. The repetition is mind melting.
        Yup, found a Finn in Croatia over 13 years ago.
        Not sure if you’ve told me much about your household arrangements πŸ€” hiding something?

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      46. Picked up a wife about 20 years ago in the wilds of Bradford and married her (or she married me) within 6 months. Neither of us wanted kids and so here we are in York free and easy. She’s from Trinidad and Tobago and her grandparents were born in India. She’s the reason I’m a better person than I was (but for Pete’s sake don’t tell her that). We bought a house and we don’t have pets and we have a lot of love for each other when we don’t get on each other’s nerves too much. Oh, and she thinks that I’m the only one that snores. πŸ˜€

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      47. Nice. That’s a solid backstory. Very quick to fall, perfect from the beginning.
        After 3 kids and a cat, I love the thought of living as couple in one of the greatest cities in the world.
        I can not deny I am jealous.
        Women don’t snore πŸ˜‚ (women can’t be convinced they snore)

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      48. Ha, I could make recordings of some of the strange noises she makes when she’s sleeping but she’d either day that they are the noises I make or that they’re faked (like I recorded some wild animal or something). I woke myself up last week by farting (something that is obviously strictly forbidden) and I lay there listening to her breathing in a kind of terror. First she was breathing normally (obviously asleep) and then she kind of sniffed in her sleep (she wouldn’t have been awake because she’d have said something) and then there was a pause in her breathing as if she was processing it, then she started breathingnin this whole other way as if she’s was trying not to breathe or she was breathing through her mouth or something – all this while she was asleep! I mean, wow – the woman is a phenomenon! It didn’t smell by the way. Just in case you were wondering. πŸ˜‡πŸ˜†

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      49. I remember a woman who did that to her husband. He said the most outlandish things. I think she made it into a book of wisdom πŸ˜‚
        I wasn’t wondering about the smell, until you said something 😳
        You could get her working at the airport with a nose like that πŸ˜‰

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      50. When I was in my early twenties I used to go to nightclubs a lot and work in the daytime and so I was always falling asleep when I was talking to my girlfriend of the time (and no, it wasn’t her – I actually really liked her). I would be talking away to her completely sensibly, drift away and would talk complete gibberish for the rest of the sentence. I was always kind of half-aware of it and it was as if I was talking to characters in a crazy dream. Proper words and phrases, buy not quite in line with… reality. Used to make me laugh to be honest. Not sure you’d have gotten a book of wisdom out of them, though. πŸ™‚

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      51. Maybe a nonsensical joke book. I wish I could remember the name. I just remember the TV spot promotion.
        You do like to make sure you aren’t offending anyone. Now I think it was her fault 🀣
        I do the same thing on occasion, usually when my wife wants a serious conversation after midnight.

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    1. Thank you 😊 It was a challenging week. I had a few failed attempts but I improved by weeks end.
      I tend to over edit, this was a way of letting go with novel November in mind.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Serious conversation after midnight? Wow, you and my wife must be twins or something. Unless, do you think it might be a feature of women in general? πŸ™‚
    Just had dinner and I’m feeling mellow. All my energy is in my tummy dissolving food and so there’s. It much left for writing. I’ll tell you my wife’s favourite joke if you like?
    So, we’re serving dinner and I’m doing the peas and one of them falls off the plate and tolls across the table and straight away my wife points to it and says “look – an escapee!” (escape-pea – geddit?). Okay, maybe it sounds better if you hear it rather than read it. πŸ˜€

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    1. I think they are much like children and raptors, they wait for the fences to be down and then they attack πŸ˜‚
      I like that joke. My go to dad joke is peed on the floor. Your wife’s has a cute, clever sophistication that trumps my vulgarity.

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      1. What? So it’s going to be, like, Battle for the Planet of the Peas?! I can’t imagine them all sitting there in the pan waiting for the fences to come down. I mean, what kind of offensive weapons are we looking at here? It’s not as if they have sharp teeth or tiny swords or surface to air missile systems? The most offensive thing I’ve ever known a pea to do is to get squashed under my slipper!! But, still – the stuff of nightmares all the same: a whole world under the iron boot of an uber-race of peas! You’ll excuse me if I don’t tell the wife about this – she’d have nightmares for sure! It was bad enough after I persuaded her to watch World War Z (aw, c’mon, Brad Pitt’s in it. You like Brad Pitt!) but mutant peas!!

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      2. You mean the pods to open πŸ˜‰
        I’m thinking body snatchers.
        You ever try cleaning peas of the floor. Slippery little suckers. And if you do crush them, they stick, just like the green blob or brain slugs. Do not underestimate the peas, they have the numbers.
        My wife asks the genre. I’m lucky if I can slide a thriller past her, with or without Brad Pitt.

        Like

      3. A little bit of knowledge is a dangerous thong. (Or isn’t that that a little bit of a thong is a dangerous knowledge to have? – I was never sure.) Yeah, I know – it’s difficult to work out what I’m talking about so here’s an easy guide: nonsense; all nonsense. πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Okay – first of all I read what you wrote and then I got to the last line. It was about your wife asking the genre. I’m going to assume from what you said (or the way that you said it) that you always tell her the truth rather than the more normal “oh, erm, I think it a rom-com but its might be wrong. It’s got Brad Pitt in it so it must be, right?” That means that she must end up, after you’ve replied to her question, with a piece of knowledge (just a small piece). So then I smiled and started to type “a little bit of knowledge is a dangerous thing but I’ve got an inaccurate right-thumb that very often hits the o instead of the i so that thing becomes thong. So then I started to make a joke about it (you know: twisting the phrase around / playing the fool) and it ended up sounding like … well, like nonsense I guess. I would have explained further but I heard my wife coming downstairs and so, because she’s very suspicious of me sending messages to people on the internet due to something that happened a few years back, I sent the message and put the phone down. So, yeah – underwear. Reminds me of an online lecture I did last week where I intended to get people to meditate but because I kept using chocolate as an example of an addiction (my only one by the way) the only thing I probably did was increase online sales of chocolate by an infinitesimal amount.
        Make more sense now? 🀠

        Liked by 1 person

      5. It always made sense, just not that sense.
        It sounds like you and I are similar in many ways, right down to the suspicious wife and chocolate addiction.
        I am truthful when answering my wife’s questions. I’ve made the mistake of trying to slip one past her and the results are never pretty.
        A dangerous little thong, would make an excellent slogan for a new Victoria’s secret range, or the title of an rnb album.
        Something that happened a few years ago πŸ€”

        Liked by 1 person

      6. Well, a few years ago I was a different person. Let’s just say that I foolishly allowed a conversation to stray into DM territory and to be more salacious than was appropriate. Not recommended and not to be repeated.

        Liked by 1 person

      7. Juicy. I havent had that issue yet. I doubt I will. Happy to hear you came out unscathed and much the wiser. I solemnly promise not to slide into your DM.

        Liked by 1 person

      8. Haha! Nice one! πŸ˜‚ Just to reassure you – it’s not gonna happen, Baby. πŸ˜‰
        (Ha – that’ll have him running for the hills!)
        Just finished watching the first Jack Reacher movie while washing the pots and started the second, but (sadly) ran out of pots to wash. 😦 What kind of books do you read (when you get the chance)?

        Liked by 1 person

      9. I do like to be called baby, makes me feel safe.
        That must have been a lot of pots to take two hours.
        I’ve watched one Reacher, no idea which one. Not my cup of tea.
        Scifi, horror, comedy, a mixture of all if I find it.
        You?

        Liked by 1 person

      10. Me? Well it started out as all sorts of stuff but I’m slowly rolling around the drain towards big budget intelligent fiction that wins awards. Basically, anything that makes me think about the human condition and gives me a different perspective on it catches my attention. The genre is mattering less and less. F’rinstance I’m reading the Crimson Petal and the White by Michel Faber right now (obviously’not ‘right now’ right now because that’d be quite a feat) and it’s caprured my attention in the way that some of the more recent sci-fi (one of my fave genres) hasn’t been able to. I guess it’s because it’s about real people (yeah, I know they’re not ‘reallly’ real) doing real things (albeit 140 years ago). It’s giving me insights into how other people might have lived – and I like that.
        And no – not the whole movie. I just watch for the 20 mins or so that I’m washing up in and then stop until next time. But you prolly knew that didn’t you. πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

      11. I’m not looking forward to that drain. Sounds far too complex for my tired twisted mind.
        If only the human mind could multitask in such a way.
        Funny, I’ve been thinking that the Scifi genre recently has become more focused on the human condition considering the state of the world.
        I may have known that. But I’m sure you could make those dishes take longer to get through an action scene 😏

        Like

      12. I agree to all of that. πŸ™‚
        Christmas has tired me. Food, people and endless washing up. How’s it going for you? Hope it’s Merry. πŸŽ…

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Good enough. Was told to pay attention and stay off my phone πŸ˜‚
    Kids lost their minds, pure adrenaline for the past 24 hours. Exhausting. The joy of parenting at xmas. Merry Christmas Rob πŸŽ„ hope it was a good one.

    Like

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